Cobra Kai Never Dies!

Growing up in the 1980s rocked. Think about it. We had Reagan sticking it to the Evil Empire and ultimately defeating the Red Bastards. Wall Street boomed. We had the best rock music (e.g. Mötley Crüe), as well as the best electronic music (e.g. Depeche Mode). It was rough and tough, yet elegant. Fighting imbued the culture with a sense of worth. Metalheads and jocks fought it out. Mods and Punks beat the shit out of each other. The current of capitalism and Americanism ran through every fiber of culture. Becoming overturned being. Hasselhoff concluded the decade with a resounding victory. Democratic society thrived.

The 1980s ended normalcy. The 1990s brought the Cold War to its inevitable conclusion and ushered in the Clinton era of political correctness and false peace--a treacherous pause in history. The new century brought a different type of war, hyper political correctness, hipsters, and the thought police in true Orwellian fashion. In more recent years, the rawness and realness of the 1980s has seemed all but lost.

Growing up in the 1980s rocked. Think about it. We had Reagan sticking it to the Evil Empire and ultimately defeating it. Wall Street boomed. We had the best rock music (e.g. Mötley Crüe), as well as the best electronic music (e.g. Depeche Mode). It was rough and tough, yet elegant. Fighting centralized, if not grounded, the culture within a sense of existential purpose. Metalheads and jocks fought it out. Mods and Punks beat the shit out of each other. The current of capitalism and Americanism ran through ever fiber of culture. Becoming overturned being. Society thrived.

Pete Rose takes out shortstop Ozzie Smith

In a continuation of the 1980s film series The Karate Kid, the YouTubeRed/Netflix series Cobra Kai revives the zeitgeist of the 1980s--bringing it back to life with the full force of a Frankenstein Messiah. With Cobra Kai badass Johnny Lawrence (William Zabka) seeking redemption vis-a-vis Miyagi-protégé Daniel LaRusso (Ralph Macchio), the show kicks you in the face. For someone like myself who earned the nickname "Killer" in Little League in 1986 for sliding in to second base and taking out the shortstop to breakup a double play (what? if it was good enough for Pete Rose why couldn't I do it?), Cobra Kai is ten episodes of pure joy of political incorrectness--slapping the thought police of 2018 in the mouth. Strike First. Strike Hard. No Mercy.